Plumbing Repair Denver CO

As Columbus, Ohio’s largest full-service plumbing, sewer repair and drain cleaning company, The Waterworks offers comprehensive capabilities and the area’s largest fleet of service vehicles.Founded in 1935, The Waterworks is privately owned and focused on providing our residential and commercial customers with truly unique, superior customer service.With over 100 team members, our staff has more than 200 years of combined expertise and has completed more than 750,000 service calls. We are always here to help 24/7.
The plumber SG1 Plumber sent to service our water heater and our toilet that had a clog and was running water helped us out immensely. They even got the remodeling job done for the plumbing in my mom's house. It was as simple as leaving a message to their hotline and the service was scheduled right away. We had an easy time communicating our concerns with SG1 Plumber and their quick response lead to action. My parents didn't need to wait that long to have their problematic plumbing fixed.
Needed to replace a water pressure regulator.  Looking at the retail costs of the regulator, they seem to run from abouit $60 to over $300 for one that includes more that the basic control of water pressure in the house.  Had not used a pro plumber for over 20 years so I was not up on the costs associated with needing their help.  I was contacted by at least 3 plumbers but only one, Right Now Plumbers, gave me an instant quote of $394  for the service without me even asking. Although I thought this price seemed a little high for a job that takes less than an hour to complete, I accepted their service.  Must say that the job was done very professionally and would use them again if needed.  However,
We have a history of pluming issues and will do anything possible to avoid that again. Once we smelled sewage in our bathroom we called The Waterworks right away. They came out the next morning and Mike was extremely helpful in alleviating our worries. He was so nice and explained everything. He gave us different options and told us if we had any other issues to give a call back. We really appreciate the good service!

Bacteria have been shown to live in "premises plumbing systems". The latter refers to the "pipes and fixtures within a building that transport water to taps after it is delivered by the utility".[34] Community water systems have been known for centuries to spread waterborne diseases like typhoid and cholera, however "opportunistic premises plumbing pathogens" have been recognized only more recently; Legionella pneumophila discovered in 1976, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most commonly tracked bacteria, which people with depressed immunity can inhale or ingest and may become infected with.[35] These opportunistic pathogens can grow for example in faucets, shower heads, water heaters and along pipe walls. Reasons that favor their growth are "high surface-to-volume ratio, intermittent stagnation, low disinfectant residual, and warming cycles". A high surface-to-volume ratio, i.e. a relatively large surface area allows the bacteria to form a biofilm, which protects them from disinfection.[35]

If you turn on your bathroom or kitchen sink in the morning to find brown or rust-colored water coming out of your faucet, don't panic. The discoloration is most likely due to old iron pipes or recent use of a hydrant or water main that disturbed the usual flow of water. Keep your water running for a minute or so and it should run clear after a while.
Garbage disposers usually come with an Allen key. Find a good place to store it, and when the disposer jams, you can follow the directions in the owner’s manual to fix it yourself. It’s as simple as inserting and twisting, and doing this yourself will save you the hassle and cash of a service call to the plumber. Speaking of tool storage, check out these clever tool storage ideas.
Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
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