Plumbing Repair Denver CO

Our company was established in 1997 by Percy Novoa and his family. The company was founded on four main principles: serving customers with integrity, providing the best products available, completing work on schedule, and treating everyone with fairness and dignity. These principles quickly earned us a reputation as one of the region's top plumbing companies, and we work hard every day to maintain and build on that reputation.


Backed by years of experience and top industry training, our certified plumbers are equipped to deal with any and every problem you may have. We put our clients needs first, offering priority solutions to a comprehensive list of possible issues. For Covington and Cincinnati plumbing repair you can trust from a team that puts your needs first, trust Schneller to provide!


Pete's Plumbing is, hands down, the best in the area! He's professional, he's quick to schedule you and he puts your mind at ease! Nothing is worse than being surprised by an unexpected leak or a backed up tub, but Pete responds quickly and calmly and explains the potential issues in a way you can understand! He obviously works hard and his prices are reasonable, can't beat that! Thanks, Pete!
But generally speaking it's easy to repair. Now for the purpose of this video I'm going to show you how to solder a 90, okay, also known as an L, which is a very small fitting. This would be, for example, let's say we installed a new vanity or a kitchen cabinet. You'd have a raw copper pipe coming out like so. All right. And then you'd need to put a joint in there of some sort. It might be an L going up like so and then a valve that would shut off the supply to your sink. Okay. So for this purpose I'm just going to solder this 90. I'm going to show you how to properly do it. Ask any plumber how to solder, and you'll get any number of different stories on how to do so. This is is how I solder, not necessarily saying it's the Bible way to solder, but this is how I do it, and it's worked for me for 20 years as a Master Plumber. You need a few things. An emery cloth, this is basically sandpaper, but it's a strip. You need a fitting brush. This is a half-inch fitting brush. You need silver solder. Be careful not to get lead. It says very clearly 95 percent/5 percent. And your trusty torch.
Water systems of ancient times relied on gravity for the supply of water, using pipes or channels usually made of clay, lead, bamboo, wood, or stone. Hollowed wooden logs wrapped in steel banding were used for plumbing pipes, particularly water mains. Logs were used for water distribution in England close to 500 years ago. US cities began using hollowed logs in the late 1700s through the 1800s. Today, most plumbing supply pipe is made out of steel, copper, and plastic; most waste (also known as "soil")[21] out of steel, copper, plastic, and cast iron.[21]

Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
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