Plumbing Repair Denver CO

Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
Natural and propane gas are popular inexpensive fuels for water heating needs. However, gas is dangerous and can explode. Gas water heaters have built in safety features that keep this from happening. The problem is that they 'Err' on the side of caution. See the articles on 'Pilot Lights' and 'Gas Water Heater Thermocouples' for some of the common failures. 

Wish these guys would have turned out to be as good as some of these reviews...they sent out a technician who gave me instructions that turned out to be false. Plumbers Service just said "sorry our guy is kind of new and shouldn't have told you to do that." That seems to be the catch phase for any company that won't take responsibility for their actions or words. When do you know if anyone is telling the truth?? How can you trust the advice they give you? Not using these guys but good luck to those of you that do...very sad that Jeff wouldn't make this right.


For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
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