Plumbing Repair Denver CO

Honesty is important to all of our employees. One way that we stay honest with our customers is by providing straightforward, upfront pricing. While other plumbers in Phoenix, AZ may surprise you with hidden fees or unexpected add-ons, we never keep our pricing a secret from you. Our experienced technicians know what it takes to complete a job, and they’ll let you know the exact cost before they get started. If you have any questions or concerns, we’re more than happy to talk with you and answer all your questions. We also provide different financing options that can help make your next project be a little friendlier on your wallet. Just ask us about them.


Like you, Danco loves seamless plumbing solutions! We help you keep every aspect of your home plumbing in perfect working condition by providing you with all the components for the job. Our range of faucet repair parts, supply line connectors, and basic plumbing components sees to it that you never have to endure a leaky faucet, broken toilet flush, or retired water heater ever again.
Our plumbing contractors are fully licensed, insured and meet standard continued educational requirements for certification in their fields so you can trust the quality of our work. We provide repairs, service, installations, and sales so whatever you need, we can help. Whether it is that annoying dripping faucet or an emergency pipe repair job, we have the correct and affordable plumbing solutions.
Wall thickness does not affect pipe or tubing size.[20] 1/2" L copper has the same outer diameter as 1/2" K or M copper. The same applies to pipe schedules. As a result, a slight increase in pressure losses is realized due to a decrease in flowpath as wall thickness is increased. In other words, 1 foot of 1/2" L copper has slightly less volume than 1 foot of 1/2 M copper.[citation needed]

I had 207 Plumbing come to fix a leak in my ceiling.  It's a terrible, terrible company to do business with.  He came and fixed a broken pipe in the ceiling, and I asked him to check the rest of the pipe to make sure that nothing else was broken, he said everything was OK and charged me $219.00 for 45 minutes and left.  Never cleaned up his mess.  I went to clean up the mess after he left and found there was more damage to the pipe.  I called him to come back, which he did.  He looked at the water coming down from the ceiling, into a light fixture and said he had another job to go to and couldn't come back until next week.  He also wanted to charge me $350.00 to come back.  I told him that was too much and he said he would make an exception and only charge me $219.00.  Now I have major damage done to the ceiling, the light fixture and the floor.  All of this could have been prevented if he had stayed and fixed the problem.  I will NOT hire him again.
A comfortable home depends in part on its temperature and humidity levels. This section shows you how to keep up with your home's heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. You'll learn how to install a whole-house humidifier, convectors, and underfloor hydronic heating. We'll also cover maintaining a whole-house humidifier, repairing old radiators, and reducing heating costs.
We have taken our most common Plumbing FAQ and in over 20 different categories and come up with simple answers in an easy to read format to provide our customers with quick access to important information. Whether you are considering a faucet repair or having problems with clogged drains or toilets, check our FAQ page to find answers to your questions. Learn More
For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
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