Plumbing Repair Denver CO

"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.

Had a clogged drain line in my upstairs bathroom. Called John Moore Services and made an appointment for the next day. Edwin G. was the Field Technician to come out to my home. I explained to him the problem and then he explained the options to me. I told him to go with the best option. Drain line was unclogged. He was very professional and very knowledgeable. He explained what he was going to do and also took pictures of the repairs once he was done. Overall it was a great experience and I have to give Edwin G. and the John Moore Services a 5-Star for a job well done. Couldn't ask for anything better, and will be using them in the future. Thank you Edwin G./John Moore Services.

Many homeowners are concerned about safety, and it can be unnerving to let a complete stranger into your home for plumbing or HVAC repairs. The best way to protect yourself and your home from unscrupulous or dangerous contractors is to research the company or contractor. Educate yourself regarding a company’s reputation and business practices. Some of the more reputable sources for this information are the CSLB, the BBB and verified review sites like Angie's List. Make sure the contractor you hire is LICENSED, insured and exercises due diligence when hiring, from felony background checks to drug testing. Not all plumbing and HVAC contractors are licensed, and many do not perform sufficient background checks. Be diligent and vigilant in protecting your greatest assets: you, your family and your home.

Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
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