Plumbing Repair Denver CO

"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.
So now I'm ready to apply heat and actually solder the joint. Again when you're using a torch, always have the fire extinguisher handy, especially if you're not a professional. Yes, I know how to use the torch better than most people that do not use it every day, but I still have a fire extinguisher right over within five feet of me. Okay. So keeping in mind now when we activate the flame on this, we don't need to blast it with as much flame as we can possibly get. There is a regulator right here that I can adjust that flame. This is an excessive flame for half-inch. It's too much heat. It will heat up too fast, and you'll see the joint actually smoke. That's not necessary. I'm only soldering half-inch. This would be a more appropriate flame for three-quarter or one-inch or something like that. So I'm going to turn this down. You can hear it. Now I've got my silver solder. One of my little quirks, I like to actually drag the emery cloth along the edge of the solder to make sure that there'
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For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
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