Plumbing Repair Denver CO

Being without hot water is no fun. But when you call Houston’s hometown plumbers, John Moore Services, you won’t have to go without hot water for long. Since 1965, Houstonians have counted on John Moore to have their water heaters replaced quickly and correctly. John Moore installs both Traditional and Tankless Water Heaters, so feel free to ask our licensed plumbers any questions you may have if you are interested in making a switch to tankless. Only select water heaters and water heater parts and connections pass our strict quality standards, so you can rest assured that your new water heater will be an efficient, cost-effective solution that will continue to meet your needs safely for many years to come. We are here to help with yearly maintenance, water heater flushes, and pan replacement. For those suffering from a leaky water heater, John Moore can even repair your water damaged walls and floors without the headache of dealing with multiple contractors. Houston homeowners have counted on John Moore for decades. We’re at your service.
It’s a family event in late October when many American households carve a pumpkin into a Halloween jack-o-lantern. The kids delight in the whole process, especially when mom and dad let junior scoop the pumpkin pulp out of the pumpkin. But what happens next is the scary part. Often, those slimy pumpkin guts are pushed down the sink drain then the disposal is turned on to chop it into tiny bits before the water washes it away. Except, it doesn’t quite ... Read More >
Our plumbing contractors are fully licensed, insured and meet standard continued educational requirements for certification in their fields so you can trust the quality of our work. We provide repairs, service, installations, and sales so whatever you need, we can help. Whether it is that annoying dripping faucet or an emergency pipe repair job, we have the correct and affordable plumbing solutions.

Some allege that putting a brick in the toilet tank can save water, but doing that can keep your toilet from flushing correctly. Another plumbing tip, avoid liquid drain cleaners. Liquid drain cleaners are also bad news—they eat away at the pipes. Try a plunger or, better yet, a $30 auger. Don’t have either? Here’s how to unclog a toilet without a plunger.


If you have questions about your plumbing system, our blog page is a great place to start looking for instant answers you can trust! As skilled plumbing professionals with decades of experience, you can trust that our plumbing blog page is current, informative, and helpful. And if you can’t find the answer you are looking for, simply Contact Us directly at 317-784-1870 for personal assistance! We are happy to take your call, answer your questions for free, and discuss your plumbing concerns without any pressure to use our services.

"We have found our plumber for life! Jim is awesome! We just bought a house with a leak in the foundation, and in spite of the complicated and extensive nature of the repairs needed, Jim quoted us an incredibly reasonable price. Having just closed on a house, though, we were extremely short on funds, and so to help us out, Jim did a temporary fix for much less, and even though he was going above and beyond and doing this extra work for us, he said he'd even deduct the cost of that repair from the total of the final, permanent repair, when we had that done!! I can't say enough good things about him - there's much more, but I don't have room!"


Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
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